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Tag Archives: Migrations

The Refugee Scandal on the Island of Lesbos

Those wishing to visit ground zero of European ignominy must simply drive up an olive tree-covered hill on the island of Lesbos until the high cement walls of Camp Moria come into view. “Welcome to prison,” someone has spray-painted on the walls. The dreadful stench of urine and garbage greets visitors and the ground is covered with hundreds of plastic bags. It is raining, and filthy water has collected ankle-deep on the road. The migrants who come out of the camp are covered with thin plastic capes and many of them are wearing only flipflops on their feet as they walk through the soup. Children are crying as men jostle their way through the crowd.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/conditions-on-lesbos-worsen-for-refugees-and-residents-a-1180209.html

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Posted by on November 24, 2017 in European Union, Reportages

 

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Canada Prepares for a New Wave of Refugees as Haitians Flee Trump’s America

Near the town of Lacolle, Quebec, just across the border in upstate New York, a cluster of blue-trimmed beige trailers has just arrived to provide temporary shelter for the unending wave of refugees, many of them from Haiti, who walk up on foot from Trump’s America. Inside the new heated trailers are beds and showers, ready to warm up frozen hands and feet, while processing and security checks take place.

Last winter, after Donald Trump’s inauguration, there was a sharp increase in “irregular border crossings” all across the Canada-U.S. border: people sidestepping official ports of entry and trying to reach safety by walking through the woods, across clearings, or over ditches. Since January 2017, Canadian authorities intercepted nearly 17,000 migrants from the U.S. (and others crossed without detection). The applications for asylum begin once migrants are safely in Canada, rather than at border crossings, where they would likely be turned back under a controversial cross-border agreement between the two countries.

The risks of the irregular crossings are especially great in winter, and this one looks to be a cold one. Last year, during the coldest months, there were wrenching reports of frostbitten toes and fingers having to be amputated on arrival in Canada. Two men from Ghana lost all their fingers after they walked across to Manitoba — one told reporters he felt lucky that he had managed to keep one of his thumbs.

https://theintercept.com/2017/11/22/canada-prepares-for-a-new-wave-of-refugees-as-haitians-flee-trumps-america/

 
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Posted by on November 24, 2017 in North America

 

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La marcia dei migranti contro il sistema di accoglienza in Veneto

“È da stamattina che parlo con questi ragazzi, ognuno di loro è una tragedia: chi ha perso un fratello, chi è stato venduto all’asta degli schiavi in Libia, chi è stato torturato”. Lino, 62 anni, ex operaio del petrolchimico di Marghera, scoppia a piangere quando racconta le storie dei ragazzi della Costa d’Avorio, della Nigeria, del Mali con cui ha passato qualche ora nella parrocchia di Mira, una cittadina a venti chilometri da Venezia.

Sono circa quaranta e hanno dormito per terra in canonica, avvolti in coperte e sacchi a pelo, dopo aver marciato per tre giorni dall’ex base militare di Conetta, in Veneto, per raggiungere a piedi la prefettura di Venezia, a cinquanta chilometri di distanza. Fanno parte dei 250 profughi che protestano contro le condizioni di un centro di accoglienza in cui vivono 1.400 persone e dove il 3 gennaio del 2017 una richiedente asilo della Costa d’Avorio di 25 anni, Sandrine Bakayoko, è morta per una tromboembolia polmonare acuta che l’ha colpita all’improvviso mentre era nella doccia, scatenando una rivolta tra gli ospiti.

Da Campolongo Maggiore i ragazzi sono arrivati stremati nelle sei parrocchie di Mira e di Chioggia, ma hanno trovato decine di persone – parrocchiani, attivisti, semplici cittadini – ad accoglierli con pasti caldi, vestiti e coperte. La sera del 16 novembre il patriarca di Venezia Francesco Moraglia aveva chiesto alle parrocchie della zona di aprire le porte per la notte ai profughi.”La popolazione si è mobilitata e i ragazzi per fortuna hanno potuto passare una notte al caldo, perché sono stati due giorni e due notti molto fredde e la situazione stava diventando davvero pesante per loro”, afferma Barbara Barbieri, un’attivista del sito d’informazione Progetto Melting Pot Europa.

https://www.internazionale.it/reportage/annalisa-camilli/2017/11/21/cona-conetta-migranti-marcia

 
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Posted by on November 22, 2017 in European Union

 

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Il parlamento europeo dà il via libera alla riforma di Dublino sull’asilo

La riforma del regolamento di Dublino sull’asilo ha ricevuto l’appoggio del Parlamento europeo il 16 novembre, con 390 voti favorevoli, 175 contrari e 44 astenuti. Dopo l’approvazione il 19 ottobre da parte della Commissione per le Libertà civili, la giustizia e gli affari interni (Libe), il testo non avrebbe dovuto passare in aula. Ma 88 europarlamentari, principalmente rappresentanti di paesi dell’Europa dell’est, contrari alla riforma, avevano chiesto che fosse messa al voto in aula.

È l’anticipo della battaglia che ci sarà nel Consiglio europeo, che deve dare la sua approvazione. In particolare i paesi dell’est sono contrari alla ripartizione dei richiedenti asilo nei diversi paesi dell’Unione. La riforma, presentata dalla parlamentare liberale Cecilia Wikström è frutto di un lungo negoziato che ha messo d’accordo sinistra, socialisti, verdi, liberali e popolari.

https://www.internazionale.it/bloc-notes/annalisa-camilli/2017/11/16/regolamento-dublino-parlamento

 
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Posted by on November 22, 2017 in European Union

 

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The Banality of Crimes against Migrants

Agnes Callamard, UN Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial, Summary, and Arbitrary Executions, presented animportant new report to the UN General Assembly on Friday. The report is on “Unlawful Death of Refugees and Migrants” — already an unordinary focus for her mandate. In recent years, her office has focused nearly exclusively on counter-terrorism, particularly on deaths by drone attacks.

As she explains, the report concerns “an international crime whose very banality in the eyes of so many makes its tragedy particularly grave and disturbing.” The contention is rather dramatic, and we believe that it is indeed historic, at least as far as reports by UN bodies are concerned.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/editorial-on-crimes-against-migrants-a-1175239.html

 
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Posted by on November 5, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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Lesbos’s Ghosts, Europe’s Disgrace

ATHENS – In 2015, hundreds of thousands of refugees landed on Greece’s island shores. Many had perished at sea. Today, the international public has been lulled into believing that Greece’s refugee crisis has abated. In fact, it has become a permanent scourge blighting Europe’s soul and brewing future trouble. The island of Lesbos was, and remains, its epicenter.

https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/greece-lesbos-refugees-inhumane-conditions-by-yanis-varoufakis-and-george-tyrikos-ergas-2017-10

 
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Posted by on November 5, 2017 in European Union

 

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Ai Weiwei Explores the “Human Flow” of Refugees and Finds an America That Lost Its Conscience

“Do you think our asylum policy is broken? Do you really think that? That’s what you wrote,” the red-faced lawyer from Homeland Security shouted at me.We were in immigration court at Federal Plaza in New York City. He was young and outraged that I had written those words in an op-ed and was now testifying as an expert witness on Afghanistan on behalf of an Afghan asylum-seeker. Clearly I had a conflict of interest.“Actually I think we have a pretty good asylum policy, but we are not implementing it,” I said.The judge interrupted.

Source: Ai Weiwei Explores the “Human Flow” of Refugees and Finds an America That Lost Its Conscience

 
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Posted by on October 26, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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End all immigration controls – they’re a sign we value money more than people

When I was a teenager I went to West Berlin with my local youth orchestra to take part in an Anglo-German cultural exchange. It was 1983 and the wall was up. As we toured the city over 10 days, we would keep butting into this grotesque cold war installation blocking our way, and butting up against my 14-year-old’s defence of socialism.At that age I reflexively rejected most dominant narratives about race, class and nation. During a period of sus laws and anti-union legislation, I already understood there had to be another version of freedom out there that included me, and I was busy piecing together the fragments of my own worldview. And yet no amount of rationalisation could shake my conclusion that people whom I disagreed with about pretty much everything else were right about the wall.Clearly, built with the deliberate intention to trap people in a place they might not want to be, the wall was heinous – not just a bad idea, but morally wrong. As such, it was the most obscene symbol of the broader case against the eastern bloc. The fact their governments would not allow residents to travel to the west was prima facie evidence of their lack of freedom: they were understood to be like open prisons.Not long after the wall came down, this entire logic went into reverse. As country after country shed its Stalinist overlords and went into free-market freefall, the case for their peoples’ right to leave was eclipsed by the fear that they might actually come. In the west their “freedom” was welcomed; their presence was not. While they were demolishing the wall, we were building a fortress. Politics kept them in. For more than a decade, before they gained admission to the European Union, economics would keep them out.

Source: End all immigration controls – they’re a sign we value money more than people | Gary Younge | Opinion | The Guardian

 
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Posted by on October 18, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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La strategia italiana per fermare i migranti in Libia è in crisi?

“Ci sono rifugiati eritrei imprigionati nei centri di detenzione di Sabrata, senza accesso ad acqua, cibo e cure mediche da almeno cinque giorni”, denuncia l’attivista eritrea Meron Estefanos, che è in contatto telefonico con un’ottantina di persone, rimaste bloccate per settimane nei combattimenti tra gruppi armati rivali a Sabrata, nel nordovest della Libia. “Ci sono sei donne che hanno partorito senza assistenza medica e almeno cinquanta bambini rinchiusi in questi centri di raccolta. Non c’è niente da mangiare”, racconta a Internazionale. Estefanos vive da anni in Svezia, ma è un punto di riferimento per gli eritrei che fuggono da Asmara, attraverso il Sudan e la Libia.“La situazione è drammatica perché una settimana fa i carcerieri hanno abbandonato i centri a causa dei combattimenti e sono scappati, così i migranti sono fuggiti, ma sono stati arrestati da altri gruppi armati e dalle forze di sicurezza, che li hanno portati in altri centri dove si trovano da cinque giorni”, afferma Estefanos, che sta cercando di mettersi in contatto con l’Alto commissariato delle Nazioni Unite per i rifugiati (Unhcr) e con l’Organizzazione internazionale delle migrazioni (Oim) per segnalare la situazione. “Ci sono persone morte a causa di ferite da arma da fuoco e che non sono state seppellite”.

Source: La strategia italiana per fermare i migranti in Libia è in crisi? – Annalisa Camilli – Internazionale

 
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Posted by on October 18, 2017 in Africa, European Union

 

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The Deportees Taking Our Calls

Eddie Anzora was sitting in his cubicle at a call center in El Salvador one day a couple of years ago, making a hotel reservation for an impatient American customer, when he spotted someone he knew from a past life. The man, who was part of a group of new employees on a tour of the office, was tall, with a tattoo of a rose on the back of his neck. His loping stride caught Anzora’s attention. Salvadorans didn’t walk like that.“Where you from?” Anzora asked, when the man reached his desk.“Sunland Park,” he replied. It was a neighborhood in Los Angeles, more than two thousand miles away, but Anzora knew it. A decade earlier, when the two men belonged to rival street crews, they had got into a fistfight there. Now they were both deportees, sizing each other up in a country they barely knew.

Source: The Deportees Taking Our Calls | The New Yorker

 
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Posted by on September 26, 2017 in North America, South America

 

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