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Tag Archives: North Korea

‘Like prisoners of war’: North Korean labour behind Russia 2018 World Cup 

A test opening of St Petersburg’s Zenit Arena in February treated 10,000 spectators to car racing, motorcycle tricks, dancers and a performing bear introduced as “Russia’s greatest hero”. But the patriotic ceremony failed to note that the stadium, in which Russia kick off the Confederations Cup in a fortnight in preparation for next year’s World Cup, was built mostly by immigrant workers from Asia, including from one of the world’s most repressive countries, North Korea.

A subcontractor who asked to remain anonymous said at least 190 “downtrodden” North Koreans had worked long hours with no days off between August and November last year and that one, a 47-year-old, had died on site. “These guys are afraid to speak to people. They don’t look at anyone. They’re like prisoners of war,” the subcontractor said.

https://www.theguardian.com/football/2017/jun/04/like-prisoners-of-war-north-korean-labour-russia-world-cup-st-petersburg-stadium-zenit-arena

 
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Posted by on July 22, 2017 in Asia, Europe

 

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Why do North Koreans Hate Us? One reason, they remember the Korean War

“WHY DO THEY hate us?”

It’s a question that has bewildered Americans again and again in the wake of 9/11, in reference to the Arab and Muslim worlds. These days, however, it’s a question increasingly asked about the reclusive North Koreans.

Let’s be clear: There is no doubt that the citizens of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea both fear and loathe the United States. Paranoia, resentment, and a crude anti-Americanism have been nurtured inside the Hermit Kingdom for decades. Children are taught to hate Americans in school while adults mark a “Struggle Against U.S. Imperialism Month” every year (it’s in June, in case you were wondering).

https://theintercept.com/2017/05/03/why-do-north-koreans-hate-us-one-reason-they-remember-the-korean-war/

 
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Posted by on May 11, 2017 in Asia, North America

 

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North Korea: The Really Serious Options on the Table

“Information Clearing House” – The National People’s Congress in Beijing made it clear that China in the 21st century as led by Xi Jinping now relies, as a state, on the  “core” leader’s “four comprehensives” as the letter of the law.

The “four comprehensives” are to build a moderately prosperous society; deepen economic reform; advance the law-based governance of China; and strengthen the Communist Party’s self-governance.

No foreign-policy adventure/disaster should be allowed to interfere with the “four comprehensives,” which, extrapolated, are also linked to the imperative success of the New Silk Roads (One Belt, One Road), China’s ambitious outreach across Eurasia.

Source: North Korea: The Really Serious Options on the Table

 
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Posted by on March 24, 2017 in Asia

 

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Caught Between Two Koreas, Malaysia Dithers on Kim Killing 

South and North Korean diplomats are battling to persuade Malaysian authorities of diametrically different versions of the February 13 Kuala Lumpur International Airport assassination of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s half-brother Kim Jong-nam, who had exiled himself out of a well-founded belief he could be murdered.
http://www.asiasentinel.com/politics/caught-between-two-koreas-malaysia-dithers-on-kim-killing/

 
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Posted by on March 4, 2017 in Asia

 

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North Korea’s Abduction Project

On the evening of July 31, 1978, Kaoru Hasuike and his girlfriend, Yukiko Okudo, rode bikes to the summer fireworks festival at the Kashiwazaki town beach. They whisked down the winding lanes of their coastal farming village, a hundred and forty miles north of Tokyo. Then they parked their bikes and made their way past a crowd of spectators to a remote stretch of sand. As the first plumes rose in the sky, Kaoru noticed four men approaching. Cigarette in hand, one of them asked him for a light. As he reached into his pocket, the men attacked, gagging the couple, binding their hands and legs. “Keep quiet and we won’t hurt you,” one of the assailants said. Kaoru and Yukiko were thrown into separate sacks and loaded onto an inflatable raft. Peering through the sack’s netting, Kaoru saw the warm, bright lights of Kashiwazaki City fading into the background.

Source: North Korea’s Abduction Project – The New Yorker

 
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Posted by on December 14, 2016 in Asia

 

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Last resort? Suing for peace on the Korean peninsula 

North Korea’s latest nuclear escapade leaves the U.S. with one option that might appear as abject concession, if not surrender, to the DPRK’s demands.
What about if the U.S. were to sue for peace – that is to say: “at last we’d like to discuss your demand for a ‘peace treaty’ marking the formal conclusion of the Korean War?”
What if the next U.S. president concluded that a “peace treaty,” which the Americans have long rejected as a trick to increase North Korea’s leverage and prestige, really represented a realistic way to defuse tensions on the Korean peninsula?
Some analysts think a treaty is what Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un wants as his scientists and engineers move inexorably closer to fixing a nuclear warhead to the tip of a missile capable of zooming to targets in Japan and South Korea – and much further afield as well.

https://www.nknews.org/2016/09/after-a-fifth-nuclear-test-the-u-s-could-sue-for-a-peace/

 
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Posted by on September 19, 2016 in Asia

 

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Night and day 

AS ERIC CLAPTON played the first bars of “Cocaine”, the country’s transformation seemed complete. The former “May 1st” stadium in Pyongyang, renamed “December 1st” to commemorate Korean reunification in 2018, was packed. Before the fifth-anniversary concert, the organisers had shown that their old mastery of mass pageantry had not been lost. After a stunning callisthenic display, children from the Ban Ki-moon High School arranged themselves to form portraits. Mr Ban himself, first president of a unified Korea, was followed by President Hillary Clinton, whose staunch support had eased reunification. Then came Kim Jong Chul, “special adviser” to the interim governments of the northern provinces, grandson of North Korea’s founding leader, Kim Il Sung, and elder brother of its last leader, Kim Jong Un.
http://worldif.economist.com/article/12135/night-and-day

 
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Posted by on September 19, 2016 in Asia

 

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Another Korean war is not in the cards

Once again, the world media are busily telling their audience that “the heightened tensions in Korea are creating a risk of war”. And once again, these panicky reports are met with little – if any – interest by the vast majority of Korea watchers and, for that matter, the South Korean public.

This quietness has reasons: First, Koreans – and Korea experts, too – have seen similar developments many times. Second, there are valid reasons to be certain that the tensions have no chance to escalate. Both sides are seriously afraid of war, and rightly so.

via Another Korean war is not in the cards — www.aljazeera.com.

 
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Posted by on August 24, 2015 in Asia

 

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In North Korea: Wonder & Terror

he northeast of China used to be called Manchuria. Another name was “the cockpit of Asia.” Many wars were fought there. A French priest who traveled through the region in the 1920s wrote: “Although it is uncertain where God created paradise, we can be sure He chose some other place than this.” The quote is from Michael Meyer’s splendid book In Manchuria.

Manchuria must be one of the bleakest places on earth, hot and dusty in summer and freezing in the long winter months. Although perhaps not quite as blood-soaked as some other places—Ukraine, say, or Poland—Manchuria has had more than its share of violence. On the southern tip lies Port Arthur, once a Russian town. Japanese troops massacred thousands of Chinese civilians there during the Sino-Japanese War in 1894. A vicious modern war—with trenches, bombs, machine guns—between Russia and Japan left about 170,000 men dead in 1905. When the Japanese clashed for three months with the Soviet Red Army on the Mongolian border in 1939, roughly 30,000 men were killed or maimed, most of them Japanese (the Soviets had tanks). And in 1948, during the Chinese civil war, more than 200,000 people were systematically starved to death in the siege of Changchun by the People’s Liberation Army.

via In North Korea: Wonder & Terror | ChinaFile.

 
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Posted by on June 17, 2015 in Asia

 

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U.S. Media Still Regurgitate Government Claims

The identity of the Sony hackers is still unknown. President Obama, in a December 19 press conference, announced: “We can confirm that North Korea engaged in this attack.” He then vowed: “We will respond. . . . We cannot have a society in which some dictator some place can start imposing censorship here in the United States.”The U.S. Government’s campaign to blame North Korea actually began two days earlier, when The New York Times – as usual – corruptly granted anonymity to “senior administration officials” to disseminate their inflammatory claims with no accountability. These hidden “American officials” used the Paper of Record to announce that they “have concluded that North Korea was ‘centrally involved’ in the hacking of Sony Pictures computers.” With virtually no skepticism about the official accusation, reporters David Sanger and Nicole Perlroth deemed the incident a “cyberterrorism attack” and devoted the bulk of the article to examining the retaliatory actions the government could take against the North Koreans.

via ZCommunications » U.S. Media Still Regurgitate Government Claims — zcomm.org.

 
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Posted by on January 5, 2015 in Asia, North America, Reportages

 

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