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Category Archives: South America

The Meaning of Che: a Revolutionary Power to Heal

On October 9, 1967, in southern Bolivia, near the barren and desolate village of La Higuera, the Bolivian Army, under instructions from the government of the U.S., trapped the isolated guerrilla column led by Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara. Che, a hero of the Cuban Revolution of 1959, believed that Cuba, only 90 miles away from the mainland of the U.S., would remain vulnerable unless other revolutions succeeded in the world. His reaction to the violent U.S. bombardment of Vietnam had been similar, not enough to defend Vietnam, he had said, but it was necessary ‘to create two, three, many Vietnams’. Failure to spark revolution in Congo led Che to Bolivia, where its army trapped him. He was eventually captured and brought to a schoolhouse. Mario Terán Salazar, a soldier, was tasked with the assassination. Che looked at this quivering man. “Calm down and take good aim,” he told him. “You’re going to kill a man.” Che died on his feet.

Source: The Meaning of Che: a Revolutionary Power to Heal

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Posted by on October 18, 2017 in South America

 

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A 50 años de su muerte: por qué aún perdura el legado del Che

El 9 de octubre de 1967, cuando los militares bolivianos y los agentes de la CIA decidieron ejecutar al Che Guevara en la aldea de La Higuera, presumieron que su muerte sería la prueba del fracaso de la gesta comunista en América Latina.

Pero no fue así. Al contrario de sus expectativas, la muerte del Che -después de una cruenta odisea de supervivencia de once largos meses- se convirtió en el mito fundacional para generaciones posteriores de revolucionarios que se inspiraron en su ejemplo y lo intentaron imitar.

https://www.clarin.com/suplementos/zona/50-anos-muerte-perdura-legado-che_0_BkbItvHnZ.html

 
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Posted by on October 17, 2017 in South America

 

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Reality TV Meets Politics, Brazilian Style

A woman weeps while sitting in a corporate board room, surrounded by a couple of frowning businessmen and floor-to-ceiling glass windows showcasing the São Paulo skyline. She’s sorry, she says, but she should have the right to make mistakes. It’s her first time on a reality TV show! And besides, all she did was mess up someone’s coffee order.João Doria, a media mogul, is unsympathetic. “Our world is the real world,” he says to the weeping woman from across the table. “It’s your world that is unreal.”Since January, a new season of reality has begun for many of us. In the United States, Donald Trump became president. Here in São Paulo, João Doria Jr. became mayor. The two men have much in common: They are conservative populists with big egos. They like to use social media to get their message out. They have both written self-help business books with uninspired titles (“The Art of the Deal” by Mr. Trump, “Lessons in Winning” by Mr. Doria).

 
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Posted by on October 16, 2017 in South America

 

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How Mexico Deals with Trump

A few months ago, at Mexico City’s Auditorio Nacional, workers were cleaning up after a triumphant viewing of “L’Elisir d’Amore,” broadcast live from the Metropolitan Opera House. Outside, in the bright sunshine, Reforma Avenue was closed to traffic for a protest. Angry people gathered on the theatre steps, waving Mexican flags and hoisting effigies of Donald Trump, and then began marching toward El Ángel, a century-old monument to Mexican independence. One protester carried a placard that read “Mexico Deserves Respect.” Another held a poster of Trump with a Hitler mustache and the tagline “Twitler.” A local activist known as Juanito carried a large American flag bearing an unflattering image of Trump and the message “Enough! Gringo Racist, Full of Shit Trump, Son of Satan, You’re a Danger to the World.” Juanito said that he was prepared to take up arms against the American incursion, demonstrating his resolve by pointing out the scars of old bullet wounds.

Source: How Mexico Deals with Trump | The New Yorker

 
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Posted by on October 3, 2017 in North America, South America

 

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The Deportees Taking Our Calls

Eddie Anzora was sitting in his cubicle at a call center in El Salvador one day a couple of years ago, making a hotel reservation for an impatient American customer, when he spotted someone he knew from a past life. The man, who was part of a group of new employees on a tour of the office, was tall, with a tattoo of a rose on the back of his neck. His loping stride caught Anzora’s attention. Salvadorans didn’t walk like that.“Where you from?” Anzora asked, when the man reached his desk.“Sunland Park,” he replied. It was a neighborhood in Los Angeles, more than two thousand miles away, but Anzora knew it. A decade earlier, when the two men belonged to rival street crews, they had got into a fistfight there. Now they were both deportees, sizing each other up in a country they barely knew.

Source: The Deportees Taking Our Calls | The New Yorker

 
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Posted by on September 26, 2017 in North America, South America

 

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¿Dónde está Santiago Maldonado?

https://www.nytimes.com/es/2017/09/06/donde-esta-santiago-maldonado/

En la Argentina un hombre no aparece. No sabíamos nada de él; ahora sabemos que lo llaman Juan o el Brujo, que nació en un pueblo de la provincia de Buenos Aires en 1989, que hace unos meses se mudó a la Patagonia, que últimamente trabajó de tatuador en Chiloé pero que lo que realmente le gusta es internarse en la naturaleza; que es capaz de sobrevivir en el bosque comiendo hongos y frutos, que es amable y buen conversador, pelilargo, tranquilo, que toca la batería y desdeña a los burgueses, que trata de vivir de otra manera. No lo sabíamos, por supuesto, y ahora sí: es curioso cómo, de pronto, una vida que pasaba tan inadvertida como casi todas se vuelve relevante. La vida de Santiago Maldonado, ahora, es decisiva. Se ha vuelto un campo de batalla de la guerrita argentina.

 
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Posted by on September 25, 2017 in South America

 

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Terror, Chaos, and Solidarity as Another Earthquake Shakes Mexico City

Momentous times. As Hurricane Maria, right on the heels of Irma, smashed its way past Dominica and toward Puerto Rico, in the Caribbean, on Tuesday, the inhabitants of Mexico City were reeling from the terrifying shock of a 7.1-magnitude earthquake that struck in the early afternoon. By Wednesday morning, more than two hundred deaths had been reported in Mexico City and in the nearby cities of Morelos and Puebla. Dozens of buildings had collapsed in the capital, while many, many more were damaged, and their occupants evacuated. Amid panic and chaos, people crowded into the streets, while plumes of dust rose from teetering structures across the city.There were several bitter coincidences about Tuesday’s earthquake. It struck just a couple of hours after Mexico City’s residents participated in an earthquake-preparedness drill, and on the thirty-second anniversary of the terrible 1985 earthquake that killed at least ten thousand people. And it came just twelve days after another powerful earthquake—the strongest to hit Mexico in a century, measuring 8.1 on the Richter scale and lasting nearly four minutes—had rocked the city. That quake had caused widespread damage and killed at least ninety-six people in states south of Mexico City—Oaxaca and Chiapas—but no one died in the capital itself. The difference in the effects had to do with the locations of the epicenters. The September 7th quake had its epicenter some five hundred miles away from Mexico City; Tuesday’s was only a hundred miles distant.

Source: Terror, Chaos, and Solidarity as Another Earthquake Shakes Mexico City | The New Yorker

 
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Posted by on September 22, 2017 in South America

 

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Cuba and the Hurricanes of the Caribbean

As bad as things have been for those who suffered loss and discomfort from Hurricane Irma in the continental United States—where millions of Floridians evacuated their homes and fled north in slow-moving processions of possession-packed cars—the difference in scale between their experience and that of residents of the affected Caribbean islands cannot be understated. That gap has only been accentuated by the advent of Hurricane Maria, which has wreaked havoc upon the island nation of Dominica. The United States citizens most directly in its path—as in Irma’s—are the people of Puerto Rico. Otherwise, only the destruction in the Florida Keys, which are, essentially, Caribbean outcroppings, is comparable. The damage to settlements on some of the Leeward Islands, such as Barbuda and the French-Dutch island of St. Martin, is so thorough that rebuilding seems neither realistic nor wise, given the likelihood that even greater hurricanes will come in the future.

Source: Cuba and the Hurricanes of the Caribbean | The New Yorker

 
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Posted by on September 20, 2017 in South America

 

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Venezuela no es una isla

Aunque no hay nada más deprimente que escribir de Venezuela, voy a volverlo a hacer. Pocas personas en Colombia conocen este nombre: Danilo Diazgranados Manglano. Se trata de un hombre de negocios neoyorkino crecido en Venezuela, amigo del presidente Chávez y muy cercano a la oscura camarilla que gira alrededor de Diosdado Cabello y otros miembros del gobierno bolivariano. De Diazgranados se empezó a hablar hace poco por ser la cabeza visible de RON, una firma de nombre muy venezolano, con inversionistas también venezolanos, pero con sede legal en la isla de Jersey, Gran Bretaña.RON compró una buena tajada de la compañía de Anthony Scaramucci, SkyBridge, que fue vendida por la no despreciable suma de 180 millones de dólares. Scaramucci, alias the Mooch, tuvo que vender su empresa para evitar conflictos de intereses y poder aceptar el puesto de asesor que le había ofrecido el presidente Trump. Su incontinencia verbal hizo que el encargo le durara apenas siete días hábiles, pero su empresa ya había sido vendida, en parte, a los venezolanos. ¿Quiénes son los inversionistas detrás de RON y de Diazgranados? Nadie lo sabe con seguridad, pero hay indicios de que este tipo es el presta-nombre o testaferro de una de las muchas tramas de corrupción con las que los boliburgueses han arruinado a Venezuela al tiempo que ellos se vuelven multimillonarios.

Source: Venezuela no es una isla | ELESPECTADOR.COM

 
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Posted by on September 7, 2017 in South America

 

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Venezuela : une opposition écrasée et divisée

Dans la cascade de rebondissements qui accompagnent la crise au Venezuela, certains faits majeurs passent quasiment inaperçus. Ce fut le cas le 31 juillet, quand l’un des ténors de l’opposition, Antonio Ledezma, se livrait à une critique publique de son propre camp, la MUD (Table de l’Unité démocratique), coalition de 28 partis opposés au gouvernement socialiste. Une première depuis 2012, quand les adversaires du chavisme avaient désigné un candidat unique à l’élection présidentielle face à Hugo Chávez.Maire du Grand Caracas et fondateur d’Alianza Bravo Pueblo, une formation sociale-démocrate, Ledezma reprochait à ses alliés un manque de sincérité et de dialogue, et une absence de stratégie après les élections législatives de décembre 2015, où la MUD est devenue majoritaire à l’Assemblée nationale.

Source: Venezuela : une opposition écrasée et divisée – Libération

 
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Posted by on August 21, 2017 in South America

 

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